Conscious

Every organisation, in fact, every human being, has an impact on the world. For Travelodge being conscious means being aware of those impacts and working to minimise the negative, while increasing the positive.

Our long-term goal is to become a net-zero business. In the coming year, we will set out the roadmap towards achieving this target, and ensure that our new build and refurbishment specifications are redesigned to reflect the importance of sustainability.

Climate change and carbon emissions

By the end of 2022 we aim to have reduced our electricity consumption by 14% compared to 2017.

Building new hotels and refurbishing our existing hotels

This year we’re looking at how we can build and refurbish our hotels creating as little carbon as we can.  

Water, Waste Management & Recycling

We have big plans for water conservation, reducing waste and improving our recycling credentials.

Responsible sourcing & supply chain management

We are constantly working with suppliers on responsible sourcing.

Climate change and carbon emissions

We know that climate change will affect our business, our customers and supply chains. We’re already planning for these changes, and they’ll be a key focus for us in 2022.

We recognise that we have a part to play in reducing carbon emissions. Back in 2019, we set up an Energy Governance Group with responsibility for monitoring the changing energy landscape and providing guidance and recommendations to the business. We also expect to have reduced our electricity consumption by 14% compared with 2017 levels by the end of 2022.

Our energy efficiency programme was set up in 2017, with the first project being to install LED bulbs in hotel common areas along with motion sensors that automatically switch off lights when they’re not needed. We have now converted the majority of our hotels and have reduced our annual electricity consumption significantly. We’re now installing LEDs into customer rooms as part of our ongoing refurbishment programme.

This year we’ll finalise our roadmap to operating our hotels on a net-zero basis.

Case Study:
Lighting

Our energy efficiency programme was set up in 2017 to install LED bulbs in hotel common areas along with motion sensors that automatically switch off lights when they’re not needed. We’ve now converted the majority of our hotels and have reduced our annual electricity consumption by 20.2 GWh or 4,283 tonnes of CO2e.

Our next focus during 2022 will be on installing LEDs into guest rooms as part of our ongoing refurbishment programme.

Case Study:
Heating and cooling 

During 2020, we began rolling out new in-room heating panels. The new units can be controlled centrally so that maximum and minimum temperatures can be set at different times of the day. This stops rooms from being overheated or the heating being left on when the room isn’t occupied. The new control system has already been applied to our in-room air-conditioning and common area air conditioning ventilation systems. 

At the end of 2021 we had installed these systems in 124 hotels or 25% of the estate, saving 12.6 GWh annually, which equates to 1,428 tonnes of CO2e. Once rolled out to the whole estate, we expect the project will save 23 GWH annually of energy equating to 5,170 tCO2e.

Case Study:
Quick wins 

Energy saving needn’t be complex. Sometimes simple changes can make a big difference. In 2019 we changed our policy of room set up, as previously they would have the bed lights on between September and May, when they’d be on from set up at 10am until guest checkout after 3pm. Flagged as a potential issue by our colleagues, changing our policy was a quick and straightforward way of avoiding energy waste. This saves about 70MWh annually, which equates to 16 tonnes of CO2e.

Building new hotels and refurbishing our existing hotels

We already develop new hotels considering our impact and include the following features:
• Low energy lighting and motion sensing controls
• Aerated showers and taps
• Full insulation
• Windows and external fixtures fitted accurately for minimum energy leakage
• Smart automatic utility meters installed
• Variable Refrigerant Flow (VRF) heating and cooling system
• Dual flush toilets

As part of our refurbishment programme we want to use products that have sustainable credentials, use as little CO2 as possible to make and that generate as little waste to landfill as possible. 

This year we’ll look at how our hotels are built from the ground up and, where we can, we’ll adjust our new build specification in a way that creates as little carbon as we can. 


Case Study:
Refurbishment of our hotels

The recycled fishing nets used to produce the yarn in our replacement carpets are part of a project supporting clean ocean initiatives, tackling over 640k tonnes of discarded fishing nets currently impacting marine life. The carpet backing is also made of old plastic bottles.

Every 10 of these bottles recycled rather than being sent to landfill saves enough energy to power a laptop for 25 hours.

In addition, Sleepeezee, the provider of our beds, was the first UK bed supplier to be awarded the Planet Mark Accreditation which recognises outstanding achievements and actions in organisations that are committed to reducing their carbon emissions.

Case Study:
New hotel build – London Docklands

Due to open later this year, our new hotel at London Dockland is designed to an ‘Excellent’ BREEAM rating and will have an Energy Performance Certificate (“EPC”) rating of A.

The hotel will minimise fossil fuel usage with the introduction of Air Source Heat Pumps to heat water and with gas only used as a top up. It will also have 40m2 of solar panels on the roof equating to over 3,000kg of carbon saving per year.

To provide customers with the opportunity to reach the sites in more sustainable ways, 50% of all car parking spaces will offer electric vehicle charging and there will also be space for 26 bicycle stands.

Water, Waste Management & Recycling

With over 580 hotels and more than 40,000 rooms we have big plans for water conservation, reducing waste and improving our recycling credentials.

Water is a vital resource, however, around 40% of the world’s population is affected by water scarcity. The challenge isn’t just global. The supply of water in the UK is becoming more unpredictable and issues around taking water from surface sources  alongside water infrastructure mean that within the next 20 years, demand for water in parts of southern England will probably outstrip supply.

Water consumption is mainly driven by use in bedrooms (showers, sink, toilets) bar cafes and cleaning throughout our hotels. We’re taking measures to reduce the amount of water we use including installing aerated showerheads and taps, which reduce water consumption by up to 50%, as well as collecting rainwater at certain hotels which is used to irrigate green spaces.

Our waste comes not just from our business but also our supply chain and guests. It can be anything from plastics, e-waste and leftover food – everything no longer needed has to go somewhere. Recycling has its place but the best way of dealing with waste is not to create it in the first place. We’ve still some work to do  on this and this year we’ll be looking at how we can reduce waste right across our business and in some cases change our processes to avoid it all together.
 

Responsible sourcing & supply chain management

From mattresses to energy, carpets to laundry services, companies within our supply chain are a key part of the Travelodge ecosystem.

Responsible sourcing and supply chain management looks at how we select our suppliers in a fair and ethical way as well as their approach to sustainability. This year, a key focus for us will be reviewing the criteria for responsible resourcing so that we can embed this in our procurement processes and procedures.

Case Study:
Removing single use plastics

In 2018, Travelodge started working with laundry services provider Elis to eliminate single use plastic from the supply chain. Previously, clean linen was shrink wrapped in plastic before being placed into cages for delivery to our hotels. Annually, this accounted for 60 tonnes of plastic waste. We are working alongside Elis to change the system to allow linen to be collected and returned in reusable and washable fabric cage liners and have completed this project at 2 out of 12 factories so far with a further 2 factories expected to transition during 2022.

Each cage liner can be used for up to 3 years and can be recycled or reclaimed at the end of its life. By the end of 2021 we have reduced our plastic use by 10 tonnes per annum. During 2022 we expect up to 16 tonnes will be removed and the aim is to remove all 60 tonnes per annum over the next three years. In addition to the benefits of removing single use plastic, the volume of rejected linen has reduced therefore saving water and energy from reducing the need to re-wash products.